WEBSITE REDESIGN CONCEPT

CVS | E-COMMERCE

USABILITY, UTILITY & DESIRABILITY IMPROVEMENTS


PROJECT OVERVIEW

I was tasked with redesigning the CVS website in order to improve its usefulness and drive desirability for using it.

CHALLENGE

Ensure when users utilize the CVS website they are able to find what they're looking for, in faster and fewer steps, as well as providing an added value for using it.


THE OUTCOME


HOW I GOT THERE


RESEARCH

 
 

HEURISTICS EVALUATION

To have a better understanding of where cvs.com stands in regards to its usability, I submitted the site through a thorough Heuristics evaluation 

Concentrating on the user flow involving finding and purchasing an item, the following heuristics are some of the examples that prevent the experience from achieving optimal usability:

For the complete heuristic evaluation list CLICK HERE


USER INTERVIEWS

After uncovering usability challenges in the site, I focused on uncovering how to increase the site's utilty by listening WHAT PAIN POINTS IF ANY, DO CUSTOMERS EXPERIENCE WHILE SHOPPING AT CVS.

Interviewees (6/6) expressed common frustrating patterns while shopping at CVS stores.

Check out is annoying, lines are too long.
I only use cvs for last minute/emergencies
When I shop CVS I always go to the store, there’s always one close by. But it annoys me when they are sometimes out of stock on what I need.

C+C ANALYSIS

Learning from other COMPETITOR'S SITES & STORE EXPERIENCES

Compiling their FEATURES AND SERVICES allow us to take a holistic view at what may make other shopping experiences even more useful. For example Amazon who is the leading E-commerce retailer, utilizes many features that may be worth testing as they may solve some of the above complaints such as free shipping, bundle and save, same-day availability.

We can also see what are some possible opportunities for feature implementation that may set CVS apart in the market place, one that seems to be ready for the taking is curbside pickup.

Grade book - Overview (3).png

CONTEXTUAL INQUIRY

While corroborating my Heuristic Evaluation and qualitative interviews data through Contextual inquiries, I determined a key utilty feature in desperate need of improvement; the search feature

Steph in Interviews. - believes she uses isle signs to locate items (product listing architecture).

When I go to shop to a CVS store, I only use isle signage to find the items I need.
 

VS

Steph in Contextual Inq.- actually asks the store clerk to find what she's looking for, particularly when in a hurry, as the majority of CVS shoppers do (search feature).

I’m in a hurry, so I’ll have to ask someone for help.

PERSONA

Narrowing THE PROBLEM

Based on the discovered patterns that culminated in our persona, the following problem was determined

 

Solving the problem

In order for the site to be easy to use, usability concerns need to be addressed (from Heuristic's evaluation) for customers to have an easy flow through the purchasing process.

Also, to increase the site's utility features such as a robust search feature may make it easier for users to find items, as well as a product hierarchy that is more intuitive.

Lastly, a holistic shopping approach which combines brick-and-mortar availability, with online shopping efficiency (such as curbside pick up) could make cvs.com a desirable experience to try out.


INFORMATION ARCHITECTURE

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CARD SORTING

I then applied closed card sorting to research the user's natural grouping patterns (taxonomy) in order to allow them to navigate CVS's vast product catalog with more ease.

It includes an ADDED VALUE FEATURE TO IMPROVE DESIRABILITY for using the CVS website was revealed through a user scenario; CURBSIDE PICK-UP.

 

synthesizing these uncovered user preferences within the online product hierarchy

The data from card sorting surfaced the following key categories within CVS' product hierarchy as summarized below.

CVS SITE MAP PORTION HIGHLIGHTING NEW PRODUCT HIERARCHY.

CVS SITE MAP PORTION HIGHLIGHTING NEW PRODUCT HIERARCHY.

 

RAPID PROTOTYPING & TESTING

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MOBILE FIRST

MUST HAVES VS. NICE-TO-HAVES

I decided to conduct a quick design studio with other designers in order to narrow down key features.  

The image below displays the end result of the design studio. A simple flow with key features such as SEARCH, and the ability to capitalize on the ease of SCANNING items though a mobile phone. The scan feature did not transfer well to the web experience, which was eventually scrapped after user testing revealed users did not utilize it as showcased in the wireframes section below.

 

WIREFRAMES

Lets see if it works

The images below showcase some of the low-fi and mid-fi wireframes that were used for testing. In them I combined findings based on the above sections including heuristic evaluation corrections, competitive analysis, interview, contextual inquiries and design studio.

*The pictures below are meant to showcase a small portion of the work that was executed and are by no means exhaustive. 

 
 

PROTOTYPE


NEXT STEPS

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  • Quantify the impact of this now more usable and desirable website experience. Concentrate on measurable usability metrics related to learnability, efficiency, memorability and errors made for the website portion. Then measure the correlation between the website improvements and the persona frustrations as it relates to what was their previous in-store experience.
  • Communicate and educate other stakeholders on the value of curbside pick-up to insure that back-end business channels support and are able to accommodate this modifications.
  • Integrate a native mobile app that includes some of the aforementioned design studio features (mobile scanner) in order to provide an even more useful and desirable user experience.